Tone- Character Analysis of Richard III

Tone was a very important part of our discussion of the play Richard III that I performed. This play’s tone can be taken different ways. Richard’s character largely depends on how his character is interpreted. He can be taken very seductively, or even sarcastically. Richard’s role as a villain “I am determined to prove a…

The motif of mirrors (and shadows)

Richard III has a recurring motif of mirrors, or ones reflection. The looking glass is referred to several times within the play, as well as what I consider to be the opposite of one’s reflection… one’s shadow. King Richard hated his reflection because he saw himself as physically unappealing, but he reveled in seeing his…

Saints in Richard III

Saint Paul and Saint George in Richard III   Not by any chance or accident does Shakespeare put down any word in his works. Therefore, it is important to inspect all things he names specifically, from planets and weather to the Saints. In Richard III, there are two Saints that are named specifically and they…

The Horror of Jealousy

Sometimes peace does not satisfy everyone, and when the person it does not satisfy ends up being the kings younger brother, problems arise. King Edward VI was physically more beautiful, and loved more than Richard III. Richard feeling inferior and jealous states “I am determined to prove a villain” (I.i.30). Throughout the play, Richard is…

Richard III: Victim of Fate or Culpable Tyrant?

In many of Shakespeare’s dramas, there is a character at play throughout whose name is not commonly listed in the dramatis personae: God. Richard III is certainly no exception to this observation, though God’s strange role (or seeming lack thereof) in the play may certainly convey such a notion. The presence of the divine is…

Duplicity: Act IV, Scene IV

  In Shakespeare’s political drama of Richard III, there are many reoccurring motifs that enhance the meaning of the play and the way it is critically read. Although possibly not easy to identify on the surface, the motif of duplicity and disguise is a really interesting concept to examine in light of Richard’s character and…

Nature in Richard III

While there were many motifs that made appearances in Richard III, references to trees and nature weren’t so prevalent. There are a few quotes about nature throughout the play, such as, “The wretched, bloody, and usurping boar, That spoil’d your summer fields and fruitful vines” (Act 5, Scene 2,  Lines 7-8). This quote discusses the nature…

Sympathizing with Richard

When thinking about the instances of madness in Richard III, it was too simple to just call Richard insane and dismiss the cause of his actions to him not liking his body as he stated in his monologue in the opening scene. During the progression of the play, I started to think deeply about Richard’s…

The Ladies of Richard III

One of the aspects that stood out to me while reading Richard III was the female characters, especially Margaret. For the most part, the female characters were rather strong minded while being surrounded by so many powerful men. One of the first women that we’re introduced to in the play is Lady Anne who is…

Richard III

In the play Richard III the characters were very important. Shakespeare used the specific characters to really bring his point across. Shakespeare uses a lot of suspicion to keep his audience intrigued. There were many important characters in the play who ended up dead. In today’s time it would be very unusual for the main…

Richard III

Stage Directions are a crucial part of reading and interpreting Shakespeare. The stage directions in Shakespeare provide some vivid imagery that help readers picture certain scenes. Even some implied stage directions can be determined through careful reading and logical reasoning. The first detailed stage direction occurs when the Dukes of Gloucester and Buckingham enter in…

What Dreams May Come for Richard III?

In many of Shakespeare’s plays, dreams serve as whimsical commentary on the events and characters or as mystical foreshadowing of what is to come later in the story.  Since the subject is asleep, dreaming is usually perceived to be a pleasant or at least entertaining.  In Richard III, however, dreams offer terror and misery instead. …